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Vietnamese Pot-Bellied Pigs Can Be Trained to Use a Litter Box

Pot-bellied pigs in the U.S. can be traced back to Vietnam in 1985 and are a domestic breed of pig who are much smaller and calmer than a farm pig. A pot-bellied pig is usually full-grown at three years of age and weighs between 50 and 200 pounds and grows to a height of 14 inches. Farm pigs can weigh 600 to 1000 pounds. They are much smaller than a normal pig and can be black, white or pink. They have a "pot-belly" that hangs down. The Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs were the pet of the '80s called the Yuppy Puppies.

Can Be Trained

Pot-bellied pigs are exceptionally clean and smart animals. They can be easily trained to use a litter box or to go to the bathroom outside. They can be trained to do many other things, such as to sit or come when called. Pigs love to be challenged and enjoy learning how to do new things.

Other Names

Their scientific name is Sus Scrofa, and they are originally native to Vietnam. The most common type of mini pig is the pot-bellied pig who is also called Vietnamese pot-bellied pig, miniature pot-belly pig, or Chinese pot-bellied pig. Another mini pig named KuneKune weighs in at around 400 pounds on average and looks more like their cousin the farm pig.

As for the Micro Mini pigs or Teacup pigs, these are just normal pot-bellied pigs that have been chronically underfed and malnourished in an attempt to keep them small. Their life span is maybe five years because the micro mini pig stays tiny, while their organs still continue to grow to a normal size for a normal size pig.

Breeds

The smallest breed of pig is considered the pot-bellied pigs. Others name them as micro-mini or teacup pigs, but these are just pot-bellied pigs that are either not full grown yet, malnourished or inbred.

Diet

Their diet is grass, plants, roots, vegetables, insects, and grubs. Pigs can gain much more weight if they are on a poor diet, get overfed, and have lack of exercise. Pigs will keep eating until they vomit.

Some pot-belly pigs have a naturally "plump" appearance with full round jowls, a rounder body and more of a "pot" belly. Others are slender and more athletic. If you can see the ribs, hips, or other bones, your pig is underweight. Your pig is overweight if your pig looks like it has swallowed a melon when looking down at him from above. If your pig has folds of fat around their eyes, it can be an indicator of being overweight.

Reproduction

Their gestation period is approximately 114 days with a typical offspring of 4 – 10 piglets.

Lifespan

Their lifespan in the wild is ten years; in captivity, it is 15-20 years.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Is there a Difference Between a Bunny and a Rabbit?

We have many famous references to rabbits over the years — Brer Rabbit, Bugs Bunny, Easter Bunny, Energizer Bunny, Flopsy Bunnies, March Hare, Peter Rabbit, Roger Rabbit, The Velveteen Rabbit, Thumper, White Rabbit, and Winnie the Pooh Rabbit. Rabbits are so cute, and small children love their stuffed animal rabbits.

Is There a Difference?

Rabbits and bunnies are the same animal – there’s no difference in breed or species, just the word we prefer to use. Both of these words refer to the same mammal, but they usually refer to that mammal at different stages of development.

Bunny

What does bunny mean? 

Bunny is another noun and another name for a rabbit, but it usually refers to a small young rabbit, often a baby rabbit. 

Rabbit 

What does rabbit mean? 

The word rabbit is a noun. A rabbit is a type of mammal. They are small, furry animals with large ears and powerful back legs that can be seen hopping around in meadows in the springtime. A rabbit is different from a hare. While they appear similar and belong to the same biological family, they are different species.

A kit is a baby rabbit.

A doe is a female rabbit.

A buck is a male rabbit.

A herd is a group of rabbits.

Lagomorphs were originally classified as rodents, but in 1912 the distinction was made between them and rodents. Hares are born with their eyes open, hair covering their bodies, and they can run within a few minutes of birth (much like a Guinea pig!). Rabbits are born naked, blind, and remain in a fur-lined nest for the first days of their lives.

Pets

Rabbits make great pets. In general, rabbits require appropriate housing, exercise, socialization, and diet for good welfare. Some rabbit breeds may require daily grooming.

Rabbits are incredibly clean animals. They are easy to housebreak and train. A pet rabbit can be taught to come to their name, sit in your lap, and do simple tricks similar to a dog.

Happy rabbits practice a cute behavior known as a “binky:” they jump up in the air and twist and spin around!

Dangerous for Rabbits

Rabbits can die from stress-induced heart attacks. A Rabbit’s fur can take a long time to dry. The rabbit can quickly get hypothermia, even on warm days if their hair is left wet. Remember to be careful when trying to dry their fur, and you may inadvertently burn the skin with the hair dryer.

Diet

Rabbits don't naturally eat root vegetables/fruit. It is a myth that rabbits eat carrots. They should only be fed in small amounts as occasional treats to a rabbit because carrots are high in sugar. Rabbits require mainly hay and/or grass, some leafy greens and a small, measured amount of pellets. Rabbits eat a diet entirely of grasses and other plants (herbivore).

Fertility

Stories abound about the reproductive nature of rabbits, and so it is not surprising that the rabbit should have become a symbol of fertility in many cultures and religions. Rabbits became associated with Easter.

A rabbit’s litter is typically between 4 and 12 babies, which results after a short 30-day gestation. A single female rabbit can produce as many as 800 children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren in just one year!

Life Span

A rabbit's life span is about eight years, though sterilized rabbits (those who are spayed/neutered) can live as long as 10-12 years.

Teeth

A rabbit’s teeth never stop growing. Normal wear from where their top and bottom teeth meet keeps a rabbit’s teeth short.

If your family gets a bunny or rabbit, we can provide quality healthcare for your furry loved one.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

 

August is National Immunization Month for Your Pets

This is a friendly reminder to talk with your Veterinarian to make sure that your furry loved one is up-to-date with its immunizations. August is National Immunization Awareness Month. The widespread use of vaccinations within the last century has prevented death and disease in millions of animals. To help improve your pet’s overall quality of life, protect your pet from deadly and highly contagious diseases, keep your pet’s immunizations up-to-date.

Reasons to Immunize

There are numerous reasons to immunize your pet:

  • Disease prevention passed from animal to animal and from animal to human.
  • Prevent illnesses that negatively affect your pets.
  • Assist your pet to live a long and healthy life.
  • Avoid costly treatments, especially with preventable diseases and early detection.
  • Protection with wildlife diseases such as rabies and distemper.
  • Be in compliance with local and state ordinances that require immunization.

Immunization Records

Your local Veterinarian can keep all of your vaccination records in one location, assist with monitoring your pet’s health, and stay current with necessary vaccinations.

Diseases

Making sure that your pet receives the proper immunizations each year can prevent serious diseases, such as:

  • Distemper
  • Hepatitis
  • Rabies
  • Parvovirus
  • Rhinotracheitis
  • Calicivirus

Some of these diseases can be transferred from your pet to the humans in your family.

Core and Non-Core Immunizations

There are two categories of immunizations — core and non-core. Talk with your local Veterinarian to discuss both types.

Immunizations to Give Your Pet

It's different for each animal. However, there are "core vaccines" (diseases that are easily transferable to humans or fatal to animals) that every cat or every dog should get.

CORE Diseases

Cats

Cats should be given immunizations every three years for the core diseases such as:

  • Distemper
  • Rabies
  • Rhinotracheitis
  • Calivirus

Dogs

Dogs should be given immunizations every one to three years for core diseases such as:

  • Distemper
  • Rabies
  • Bordetella (parvovirus)
  • Adenovirus

NON-CORE Diseases

You can also immunize your pet for non-core diseases.

Cats

  • Bordetella
  • Chlamydophila
  • Feline infectious peritonitis
  • Feline leukemia

Dogs 

  • Kennel cough
  • Leptospirosis
  • Lyme disease

Talk with local Veterinarian about how often your pet should receive the immunizations. Consider your pet’s different factors such as age, breed, health, lifestyle (indoor vs outdoor, foods they eat, etc.), and travel habits. 

Preventive health care is a great course of action for your animals. Catching a disease early is important. Discuss your pet’s nutrition, dental care, flea, tick and heart prevention to get recommendations tailored to your furry loved one’s health and risk factors.

We strongly urge you to get a Pet ID and Microchip to find your pet in case they are ever lost or run away. You will have a better chance of locating them quickly with a microchip.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

 

How Do Tapeworms Affect My Dog?

Did you know that there are five types of worms that can seriously affect your animals? One of the most common health problems for dogs is worms. There are five types of worms that generally affect dogs, and in this is series, we will discuss each type of worm:

This is the last blog in the series of worms, and we will discuss Tapeworms.

What are Tapeworms?

Tapeworms are a parasitic long, flatworm that attach themselves to your dog’s intestines and some species can infect humans. In areas where sanitation facilities are lacking and close contact with animals it is more common to get infected.

Infection

In humans, tapeworm infections occur as a result of eating raw or undercooked fish, beef, or pork, from an animal that was infected. A secondary cause of infection is improper handwashing after coming into contact with tapeworms or tapeworm eggs. Cysticercosis is a serious infection if you ingest pork tapeworm eggs

Anatomy

A tapeworm consists of multiple body parts. They are also called segments. Each segment has its own reproductive organs. When diagnosing a tapeworm infection, a vet usually finds a segment which appears as a small white worm that may look like seeds or grains of rice. The worms will appear in your dog’s feces, on the rear end of your dog, or where your dog lives and sleeps.

Hosts

Tapeworms have several different kinds or species that can infect your dog. They each have stage(s) in a different in-between or intermediate host, which the dog eats to become infected. Here are the tapeworms and its intermediate host:

  • Dipylidium caninum - fleas
  • Taenia and Echinococcus- small rodents (mice, rats, squirrels), rabbits, or large animals (such as deer or sheep)

Symptoms

Most tapeworms do not produce obvious symptoms in dogs, other than worm segments on your dog's rear end or feces. Call your veterinarian for an appointment to get an accurate diagnosis and safe, effective treatment options.

How do I prevent my dog from getting tapeworms?

To prevent your dog from getting tapeworms, keep your dog from coming in contact with fleas, small rodents, rabbits, or large animals. These are intermediate hosts which contain the tapeworm larvae. Flea control is an excellent prevention measure because fleas are an intermediate host for the most common kind of tapeworm. Flea control is consistent, safe, and effective flea control.

Can tapeworms harm humans?

A specific type of tapeworm found in cats or dogs can cause serious disease in humans. They are the Echinococcus tapeworm species which are very uncommon in the United States and are readily treated by prescriptions available from your veterinarian. There are rare reports of Dipylidium (a common tapeworm in pets) infections in children, but these infections are not associated with significant disease.

Other kinds of worms that dogs can get include: Heartworms, Hookworms, Roundworms, and Whipworms.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Whipworm is a Common Intestinal Parasite of Dogs

Did you know that there are five types of worms that can seriously affect your animals? Worms are one of the most common health problems for dogs. There are five types of worms that generally affect dogs, and in this is series, we will discuss each type of worm:

This blog will discuss Whipworms.

What is Whipworm?

The whipworm is a common intestinal parasite of dogs which reside in the cecum where the small intestine and large intestine meet. When dogs swallow infective whipworm eggs in soil or other substances that may contain dog feces, they become infected. 

Why Named Whipworm?

Whipworms get their name from their shape. They have a thick anterior end and a long, thin, posterior end that resembles a whip. The thicker end embeds itself in the intestinal wall as the worms mature, causing irritation and discomfort.

Whipworm Lifecycle

The three stages of the whipworm life cycle are:

  • Egg
  • Larvae
  • Adult

In the large intestine, adult whipworms lay their eggs, where they are then passed into the dog’s stool to infect the environment. The eggs mature to an infective state, or embryonate, in the environment, and are ready to re-infect the host or infect a new host in 10-to-60 days. If ingested, the eggs hatch and mature in the lower intestinal tract, where they attach to feed and lay more eggs, continuing the cycle.

Symptoms

In the early stages, dogs may not show signs of whipworm infections. Once the whipworms attach to the cecum and colon, they can cause irritation. The more volume of whipworms, the greater the irritation, which can lead to anemia, diarrhea, weight loss, and bloody stools which are symptoms of parasites and other serious diseases.

Diagnosing

Taking a stool sample and examining it under a microscope is the best way to diagnose a whipworm.

Treatment

Your veterinarian may prescribe one of many anti-worm medications to kill the parasites in your dog's system and help alleviate his symptoms.

Prevention

Many common heartworm preventatives also prevent whipworm infections. Prevention is the best way to keep whipworms away from your animal.

Can Humans Get Whipworms?

Trichuris trichiura is the type of whipworms that humans spread through human feces. The infection most often occurs in children. It is also more common in people who live in regions with hot, humid climates and in areas with poor hygiene and sanitation.

If you think your animal has any of these symptoms or has been exposed to Whipworms, make sure you contact your Vet?

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment

Roundworms are Most Common Parasitic Worms Found Inside a Dog

Did you know that five types of worms can seriously affect your animals? Worms are one of the most common health problems for dogs. There are five types of worms that generally affect dogs, and in this is series, we will discuss each type of worm:

This blog will discuss Roundworms.

Unfortunately, roundworms are one of the most common parasitic worms found inside an animal, specifically a dog. At some time in their lives, almost all dogs become infected with them. It is usually as puppies. They can be contracted in different ways, which makes them easy to spread and hard to control.

From the time your dog is born, they may be infected with roundworms. Worms pass to the puppy from their mother while the pup is still in her body.

Another way that roundworms can develop in a puppy is after the puppy is born and eats larvated eggs from the environment or drinks worm larvae (young worms) in the mother's milk.

Roundworm larvae are present in the tissues of mice and other small mammals. If a puppy eats one of these mammals, they can get roundworms.

How will they affect my dog?

If your dog is infected, adult roundworms live in the dog's intestines. Unfortunately, some dogs do not have any signs of infection, so it may be hard to detect. The dogs that have major roundworm infections, especially puppies, show diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss, dull hair, and a potbellied appearance. If the roundworms move into your dog's lungs, your dog may cough.

Adult roundworms can show up in your dog's feces or vomit. They present themselves as white or light brown and may be several inches long.

Roundworm Prevention

There are several things you can do to prevent roundworm for your furry loved one:

  • Keeping your dog's living area clean
  • Remove feces regularly
  • Try to prevent your dog from eating wild animals that may carry roundworms

Remove Roundworm

To remove roundworms that are passed from the mother, puppies should be treated at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of age and then receive a preventive treatment monthly. Stool examinations should be conducted from 2 to 4 times during the first year of life. With adult dogs, stool examinations should be performed 1 or 2 times each year. Monthly preventive meds should be given to nursing mothers and also treated along with their puppies to decrease the risk of transmission.

Make sure you ask your vet about prevention and treatment because many heartworm preventives include controlling roundworms.

Can roundworms harm humans?

Roundworms can be a significant risk to humans if humans ingest or come into contact with contaminated soil or dog feces. Wherever pets deposit feces, roundworm eggs may accumulate in significant numbers in the soil. These worms can cause eye, lung, heart, and neurologic signs in humans if infected.

Keep children’s play area separate from where animals have passed feces. Individuals should wear gloves or wash their hands immediately if they have direct contact with soil that may have been contaminated by cat or dog feces

Give us a call at 770.438.2694 or schedule an appointment to discuss your beloved animal and possible worms before it gets serious!

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Can Humans Get Hookworms From A Dog

Yes, humans can get hookworms from a dog? Hookworms from dogs penetrate a human’s skin and then infects them. It can be transmitted by walking barefoot on the beach, digging in the garden or other locations where pets deposit feces.

According to the CDC, “an estimated 576-740 million people in the world are infected with hookworm. Most people infected with hookworms have no symptoms. People infected for the first time can have some gastrointestinal symptoms. Blood loss leading to anemia is one of the most serious effects of hookworm infection, in addition to protein loss. Medication prescribed by your health care provider can treat Hookworm infections”.

Worm Series

Did you know that there are five types of worms that can seriously affect your animals? One of the most common health problems for dogs is worms. There are five types of worms that generally affect dogs, and in this is series, we will discuss each type of worm: 

This blog will discuss Hookworms.

Causes

There are four different ways a dog can get hookworms:

  • In utero
  • Skin contact
  • Ingesting orally
  • Through mother’s milk

When a dog sniffs or eats contaminated soil or feces, they can accidentally ingest the larvae. While dogs are drinking contaminated water or grooming their paws, larvae can burrow into the skin of unsuspecting dogs if the dog lies on contaminated soil.

Mothers can pass hookworms on to their pups. The larvae infect the puppies either in the uterus or through the bitch’s milk when the puppies nurse. For puppies, hookworms can lead to severe anemia, which can be fatal.

Symptoms

A dog with the hookworms parasite is not healthy. Here are some symptoms:

  • Looks unhealthy
  • Poor appetite
  • Pale linings of dog’s lips, nostrils, and ears
  • Pale gums
  • Coughing (advanced if hookwormlarvae are in your dog’s lungs)
  • Dark and tarry stool
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Weight loss,
  • Pot-bellied appearance
  • Dull coat
  • Poor growth
  • Itchy paws
  • Low energy 

Diagnosing

To find out if your dog has hookworm, your vet will perform a diagnostic test called a fecal float. This reliable test is generally a good method of detecting hookworms.

In young puppies, the test is sometimes less reliable, as it takes two-to-three weeks for the larvae to mature and produce eggs, so talk to your vet about deworming protocols that can help prevent a hookworm infection in litters. 

Prevention

The key to treating hookworms is preventing reinfection. To prevent reinfection, it is imperative to clean up your dog’s feces immediately because the eggs pass through the feces.  Your vet can add a heartworm preventative medicine to take until the hookworm comes out. 

An overcrowded kennel is a perfect environment for Hookworms since they thrive in warm, moist environments. This is why it is extremely important to use proper kennel hygiene, cleaning up after dogs and disinfecting runs and yards. Check to see if the dog facility follows standard kennel protocols. Stay away from areas where there are large amounts of dog feces on the ground.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Important Information You Need to Know About Heartworm that Affects Your Dog's Health

Did you know that there are five different types of worms that can seriously affect your animals? One of the most common health problems for dogs and other animals is worms. Worms generally negatively impact a dog's health, and in this continuing series, we will discuss each type of worm:

What is heartworm disease?

Heartworm disease can be deadly in animals. The disease starts with the bite of an infected mosquito. The worms penetrate the dog's tissue, and they migrate to the bloodstream and then enter your pet's heart and lungs. The heartworms can be foot-long worms.

Heartworm disease affects the following mammal species which include: dogs, cats and ferrets, wolves, coyotes, foxes, sea lions and—in rare instances—humans.

Symptoms

If your dog has these symptoms, contact your vet asap to determine if it is heartworm disease or not:

  • a mild persistent cough
  • reluctanceto exercise
  • Difficulty breathing
  • fatigueafter moderate activity
  • decreased appetite
  • weight loss
  • Enlarged liver

As the disease progresses, many pets develop heart failure and the appearance of a swollen belly due to excess fluid in the abdomen.

Prevention

Prevention is the best weapon against heartworm disease. A vet can perform a yearly blood test to detect a heartworm infection. It is recommended that treatment with a broad-spectrum parasite control product be given to your dog year-round to prevent heartworm.

Can heartworm be cured?

Most dogs that are infected can be successfully treated.

The disease protocol is to stabilize your dog first if he is showing signs of disease. Then using medications eliminate all adult and immature worms while keeping the side effects of treatment to a minimum.

Transmitted from one pet to another?

A dog is a natural host for heartworms, which means that heartworms that live inside the dog mature into adults, mate and produce offspring. If heartworm is left untreated, the number of worms can increase, and dogs have been known to harbor several hundred worms in their bodies.

In the heartworm life cycle, mosquitos play the most significant role. Heartworms that are living in an infected dog, fox, coyote, or wolf produce microscopic baby worms called microfilaria that circulate in the bloodstream.

Worms can seriously damage your dog’s internal organs and lead to loss of consciousness and death if untreated. If your dog has any of these symptoms of worms, contact your vet immediately.

Once diagnosed, most intestinal worms can be reasonably easy to treat with medication. Heartworm is much more severe to your dog's health. Treatment can be expensive and difficult for your dog. The best approach with heartworm is monthly preventive medication, which can also prevent other worm infections. Contact your vet for recommendations for your dog.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Five Types of Worms that Affect Your Dog's Health

Did you know that there are five different types of worms that can seriously affect your animals? One of the most common health problems for dogs and other animals is worms. Worms generally negatively impact a dog's health, and in this continuing series, we will discuss each type of worm:

  • Heartworms
  • Hookworms
  • Roundworms
  • Whipworms
  • Tapeworms 

Some of the worm types are much easier to spot than the others. When you see something that looks like grains of rice in your dog’s stool, it is probably tapeworm. Heartworm is much harder to diagnose. An infection in your dog might only show subtle symptoms until it has progressed to an advanced stage.

Symptoms of Worms in Dogs

The most common symptoms of worms in dogs are the following items:

Low energy

If your dog suddenly becomes lethargic and less active than usual, it may be a symptom of having worms.

Diarrhea

Worms can also present themselves as a symptom of soft stools and canine diarrhea. Dogs with hookworms can have blood in their stools too.

Vomiting

If your pet throws up, this can be a symptom of works, especially roundworms.

Change in appetite

Another system is a sudden change in your dog’s appetite. Your furry loved one may have come into contact with roundworms. Dogs that lose their appetite completed are often infected.

Bloated appearance

Your dog may have contracted worms if they are bloated or starts to appear pot-bellied. This is a common symptom in puppies if they have picked up worms from their mother.

Weight loss

If your dog has a rapid weight loss, they may have a whipworm or tapeworm.

Coughing

Coughing can be a symptom when your dog has an advanced stage of heartworms. A cough may be present in dogs with hookworms and roundworms too.

Itching and signs of skin irritations

Skin irritation may indicate that your dog may have a severe infestation of worms.

Dull coat

A shiny, thick coat is a sign that your dog is healthy. A symptom of worms is that your dog’s coat begins to dull and dry out. Rashes or hair loss can also indicate worms.

Rubbing its bottom on the ground or "scooting."

Dogs occasionally rub their rear ends on the floor in order to relieve themselves of an itch that may be caused due to worms in the area. This behavior can also be caused by problems with the anal glands as well.

Visible worms in fur or fecal matter

Tapeworms can appear as tiny moving items in a dog’s fur or area around their anus. Check your dog’s stools for roundworms.

If you Suspect Worms

Worms can seriously damage your dog’s internal organs and lead to loss of consciousness and death if untreated. If your dog has any of these symptoms of worms, contact your vet immediately.

Once diagnosed, most intestinal worms can be reasonably easy to treat with medication. Heartworm is much more severe to your dog's health. Treatment can be expensive and difficult for your dog. The best approach with heartworm is monthly preventive medication, which can also prevent other worm infections. Contact your vet for recommendations for your dog.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Take Your Pet to Work Week

Pet lovers - Mark your calendars with these two dates coming up in June for you to take your furry loved one to work.

  • June 17 – 21 is Take Your Pet To Work Week® (June 17-21)
  • June 21 is the Take Your Dog To Work Day®

Before you plan on bringing your animal to your office, make sure your business allows it and check with their policy. Maybe you can help them implement a new policy for this week and day. Here is some ammo to support that shift in your office.

Friday, June 21, 2019, is Take Your Pet to Work Day established by Pet Sitters. This year is the 21st year of Take Your Pet to Work Day, which raises awareness and funds to support animal rescue and shelter dog adoption.

History of Take Your Pet To Work Day

In 1996, Pet Sitters International decided that there were far too many instances of people leaving their animals at home while they went about their workday. These amazing people are dedicated to saving animals from local shelters and humane shelters and helping them find good homes with people who will love and respect them.

Pet-Friendly Companies

There is research that suggests that dog owners bringing their dogs to work offer stress relief. Animals also break the ice during tense meetings and encourage socializing at work.

According to Fortune.com, here are ten pet-friendly companies where every day is Take Your Dog to Work Day.

1. Bissell

2. Amazon

3. Zynga

4. Nestle Purina

5. Salesforce

6. PetSmart

7. Google

8. WorkDay

9. Zoosk

10. Ticketmaster

Take Your Pet to Work Day Activities

Take advantage of Take Your Pet To Work Week® by these methods:

·      Participate in the holiday with your dog

·      Volunteer at an animal shelter

·      Sign up for a training class

We love this week because:

1.   It celebrates dogs

Dog lovers love to have their animals with them, talk about them and show them off to others o having the ability to introduce your dog to your coworkers is a great way to celebrate your dog’s best traits. Your dog may help to change someone else’s mind about how they feel about dogs.

2.   It can make work more fun

By bringing their animals to work, people may be more excited about coming and the day will go faster.

3.   It isn’t necessarily just for dogs

If you don’t have a dog or cat, bring in a parrot, goldfish, or borrow a dog from your friends, neighbors or family?

We love working work animals and seeing them in our office every day. It brings all of our staff much joy.

Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

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