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Get a Pet ID and Microchip During National Pet ID Week

Have you ever lost a pet? They got out of your front door, backyard or car and ran. Or, worse, someone stole your animal. The fear and panic we feel knowing our loved one is missing, cold, hungry, scared and that we may never find them. Don’t put yourself through that unnecessary experience.

According to the American Humane Association, in the U.S. every year over 10 million dogs and cats are lost or stolen in the U.S. every year. During their life, one in three pets will become lost at some point.

National Pet I.D. Week – April 14th – 20th

During National Pet ID Week, take the time to update your pet’s information, put the information in a safe location and check out other methods to identify and keep track of your beloved pet. If your pet went missing, would someone be able to quickly identify your dog or cat and return them to you safe and sound? A big issue when a pet goes missing is that there is no easy way to identify that pet and return them to their owner.

Methods to identify pets

Personalized ID Tag

Your pet should always wear an identification tag. Microchips are another valuable resource in locating your animal, but the ID Tag can help someone instantly contact you just by seeing a phone number to call on the tag. I.D. tags are, by far, the most common and quickest ways to identify a pet. These super popular and handy accessories can be found at nearly any major retailers that carry pet goods or the pet store.

Microchip

Get a microchip for your pet. ID tags can be removed or fall off. A microchip is a tiny electronic device which is injected under the skin. So, if a shelter, veterinarian or animal-control officer locate your pet, they can wave a scanner over the chipped area and find the pet’s unique identification number. When they put the number into a database, you and your pet will be reunited.

Microchips are probably the most reliable way to make sure that your pet can be identified by a rescuer or veterinarian that comes in contact with them while they are lost. The actual process of microchipping your pet is relatively painless and, once installed, need to be registered with the microchip company.

Keep information current

Keep the microchip information up-to-date. If you move or if your phone number changes, make sure you update the microchip company.

State and Rabies Tags

In the State of Florida, it is required by law to it is required by law that each dog, cat and ferret over the age of 4 months receive a rabies vaccination, even if they are “indoor only” animals.

When you take your pet to the vet for a vaccine, they will give you a Rabies Tag. This tag includes the tag number and a certificate from the county/state. You can call that county that issued the tag and provide the tag number. The county/state should be able to find the pet in their records.

State License

These are a great, and sometimes mandatory, way to I.D. your pet. These forms of I.D. will generally have more information about your pet such as color, breed, and microchip number if available. State licenses are usually cheap and are sometimes required by state law to be registered. Please check with both your local and state governments to ensure that you are carrying the proper identification for your pet at all times.

Make sure you can locate your pet if they ever go missing. Contact your local veterinarian to get your animal a microchip and other items they need to be found. Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

 

Dogs and Cats Preventive Health Care

We consider our pets family, and just like our children, our dogs and cats need regular wellness exams and preventive health care. A Veterinary forming an evaluating your pet's overall health is vital to good long-term health. There are risks associated with disease or other health problems that a Veterinarian can catch before the issue becomes dire.

It is recommended that you consider your pet's nutrition, dental care, vaccinations and flea, tick and heart prevention. A Vet can access and offer recommendations specifically tailored to your furry loved one's health and risk factors.

Preventive health care

Imagine if you could put a stop to your pet’s health issues before they even started? You can by establishing a quality and routine preventive care program for your pet.

Part of a wellness visit or preventive health care plan is a health evaluation. The visit will include an inquiry about your pet's history, breed, age, lifestyle, behavior, and diet; a comprehensive physical exam; and necessary measurements like temperature, weight, pulse, and respiration rates. Collectively this information will help assess whether a pet might actually be sick rather than well.

Your Vet can provide a preventive care program that includes:

  • Comprehensive healthy pet checkups and physical exams every six months
  • Vaccinations
  • Spay / Neuter discussion
  • Routine dental care
  • Routine blood and urine testing
  • Intestinal parasite control
  • Flea, tick, and heartworm prevention
  • Nutritional and behavioral counseling
  • Weight management

Check-Ups

At a pet check-up, you should discuss these items with your Vet, especially if you have noticed a change or issue:

  • Diet,
  • Exercise,
  • Lifestyle
  • Behavior
  • Thirst,
  • Breathing,
  • Habits,
  • Bowel movements and urination, and
  • General health.

Your Vet will perform a physical examination on your dog or cat and knows your pet's prior history so they will know what recommendations to make. The vet will check your pet's teeth and gums, skin, eyes, ears, and bones thoroughly. Notify the Vet if your loved one has any lumps or bumps to examine as well.

How often?

An adult pet should be seen by a veterinarian at least annually (some cases semi-annually is better) for an assessment of their preventive care needs. Puppies and kittens will require more frequent visits, about every 3-4 weeks until they are about four months old. 

Benefits

The benefits of receiving preventive health care for your animal can: 

  • Prevent a pet from becoming sick.
  • Catch diseases early.
  • Prevent the transmission of diseases and parasites.
  • Keep pets comfortable by preventing flea and tick infestations.
  • Prevent possible painful periodontal disease and teeth extractions by making sure you implement dental care and routine professional dental cleanings.
  • Delay or prevent the onset of diseases.

 Keep your pet healthy and happy by contacting your local veterinarian and set up your pet’s wellness visit. Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Cat Breeds that are Hypoallergenic for Humans

A lot of humans are allergic to cats. You can hear the sneezing start up right after they have spent some time in a home with a cat or multiple cats. Their eyes start getting itchy, swollen and red. Some people even get hives and it closes up their throat and they can’t breathe so it is a pretty serious issue.

Does your family love cats and want one but your health can’t handle it? Have you considering looking into hypoallergenic breeds so everyone is happy and safe?

Hypoallergenic?

What does the term hypoallergenic mean?

According to PetMD, “some feline breeds are considered "hypoallergenic," which means they produce fewer allergens than others. Cats do produce pet dander, a common allergen, but the culprit for the estimated 10 percent of the population who are allergic to cats may be a protein, Fel d 1, that is present in cat saliva. Technically, there is no such thing as a 100 percent hypoallergenic domestic cat (or dog). If your allergy is not severe, these breeds should come pretty close”. The protein in a cat’s saliva called Fel D1 is what usually makes an allergic person take antihistamines, sneeze, have itchy eyes or even have an asthma attack.

10 hypoallergenic cat breeds

The following 10 cat breeds produce less of this protein than others, which makes them hypoallergenic. With this information, start looking at shelters, vet offices and the adoption process for your family. PetMD reports that these 10 breeds are hypoallergenic:

Devon Rex

Just independent enough to be an ideal cat for working families, the Devon Rex will shower its people with love and attention when they are around, and stay out of trouble when they are not. And, because it sheds very little, it does not shower the home in hair.

Cornish Rex

The Cornish Rex is a strikingly unusual cat; small to medium in size with an egg-shaped head, long legs, and large ears. Affectionate and attention-seeking, the Cornish Rex is a high energy cat that bonds well with its human family. 

Javanese The Javanese possesses a high degree of intelligence and seems to understand when spoken to. It will look a person straight in the eye and answer with a meow. In fact, the cat is well-recognized for its excellent communication skills. Javanese are also loyal to a fault and can be easily trained.

Sphynx Cat

Though they appear to be hairless, many Sphynxes are actually covered with a fine gossamer down which can only barely be felt or seen. Because of its fineness, the skin of the Sphynx is often compared to warm suede. It is often heavily wrinkled around the shoulders, between the ears, and around the muzzle. A well-behaved, high energy cat, the Sphynx is a true extrovert who loves human attention and will show off to keep it. 

Balinese The coat on the Balinese is of a silky texture and single coated, with only minimal shedding. In fact, the Balinese is noted for its lack of shedding amongst long coated cats. Speaking and interacting with humans is what it is most fond of. This breed is ranked as one of the most intelligent of cat breeds, and is also remarkable for its good humor, good nature, and high energy. Getting along well with both animals and people is one of the strongest qualities the Balinese possesses.

Oriental Shorthair

The Oriental Shorthair is long and slender, with large ears and piercing almond-shaped eyes. It is a member of the Siamese family. However, unlike the Siamese, the Oriental Shorthair comes in over 300 colors and patterns. It is also less “talkative” than the Siamese, but is still fond of chatting and is never too tired to strike up a “conversation.” This is a cat that needs to be the center of attraction. Lavish an Oriental with love and it will return it in full measure. 

Russian Blue The Russian Blue was named for its coat, which is lavender at the base (root), darkening along the shaft up to the tips of the guard hairs, which are tipped in shimmering silver. One of the more curious and amusing features of the Russian Blue is its “smile.” It has a slightly upturned mouth, which is frequently compared to the enigmatic Mona Lisa smile. The Russian Blue can spend hours amusing itself and does not mind an awful lot if it is left at home alone for the day, but it will be very happy to see you when you do arrive. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys and sunbeams. 

Bengal Though it is not a lap cat, the Bengal does enjoy human company and will often stay close to its family members. The Bengal particularly enjoys the company of children, since its energetic nature makes it very fond of playing games.

Colorpoint Shorthair The Colorpoint Shorthair is a first-cousin of the Siamese, and like its cousin it is a born extrovert, making friends easily, chattering persistently, and showering its owner with love. The Colorpoint is also remarkably sensitive to moods. If someone is moved to tears while watching a tragic movie, this cat will try to bring them comfort.

Siberian

The Siberian does not blend easily into the background. It is a large cat, with a lush double coat. This may seem counter intuitive at first, but remember that it is not the hair that makes a cat allergenic. The Siberian is notable for having a low level of the Fel d 1 protein in its saliva, so people with relatively mild allergies will often be able to tolerate living with this affectionate breed.

Which one is your favorite? If you have any questions about which pet is best for you, talk with your local veterinarian? Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

My Dog Eats Grass. Is that Okay?

When I take my dog out for a walk, he ends up eating grass and then vomits. Does this sound familiar? You are not alone in your concern.

“Dogs love to munch away on grass, and some even make it part of their daily routine. Fortunately, most experts believe it isn't something you should worry about. So why exactly do they gobble up that green stuff in your yard?

Dogs, unlike their catty counterparts, are not carnivores. But they're not like your garden-variety omnivores, either. For tens of thousands of years, these opportunistic scavengers have devoured anything and everything, as long as it fulfilled their basic dietary requirements.

The modern dog, partly because of evolution and domestication, is no longer like its ancestors, which frequently ate their prey entirely, including the stomach contents of plant-eating animals. Instead, dogs today seek out plants as an alternative food source. Most commonly the plant is grass -- since that is what is closest at hand -- but wild canines are known to eat fruits, berries, and other vegetable matter, too,” according to PetMD.

There are several reasons why your dog might be eating grass:

Boredom

They are bored. If this is the case, giving them more exercise with help with that.

Nutritional deficiency

“Pica is the technical term for the disorder characterized by eating things that aren’t food. Sometimes pica indicates that your dog has some type of nutritional deficiency, though it is often simply a sign of boredom, especially when practiced by puppies and younger dogs.

Dogs eating grass is actually quite common (it has been observed in wild dogs, too, and may be completely natural) and this form of pica does not usually cause too many problems. In fact, most veterinarians consider it a normal dog behavior. One small-scale study of 49 dog owners whose dogs had regular access to grass and other plants found that 79% of the dogs had eaten plants at some time. Another survey about plant-eating dogs found that grass was the most commonly eaten plant. On the chance that your dog’s pica behavior is caused by a nutritional deficiency, switching to a better dog food, especially a high-fiber variety, could help alleviate the problem”, states Pets.WebMD.com.

Don’t feel well

There is a school of thought that dogs turn to eating grass when they don’t feel well as a way to make themselves vomit, which in turn makes them feel better.

Improving digestion

Your dog might be eating grass to improve digestion, treating intestinal worms, or fulfilling some unmet nutritional need, including the need for fiber.

Typically grazing itself isn’t harmful for animals. Consider that certain herbicides and pesticides used on lawns can be quite toxic, especially if your dog ingests the grass with the toxins on it.

Time to get concernedThe American Kennel Club reports that “if your dog's vomiting can be described as any of the following, then it is time to start getting concerned:

  • Continuous vomiting
  • Chronic vomiting
  • Vomiting a lot at one time
  • Vomiting with other symptoms, like fever, weight loss, lethargy, anemia, etc.
  • Vomiting blood
  • Vomiting with nothing coming up
  • Bloody diarrhea
  • Suspected foreign body ingestion
  • Seizures

It never hurts to play it safe when it comes to dog health. The best way to find out if your dog’s vomiting is normal or not is to call your vet”.

If in doubt whether there is an issue or not, make sure you talk with your local veterinarian? Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Wildlife Crossings are Saving Lives

If you are an animal lover, you will be interested in knowing about what has been happening in several states around the country with wildlife conservation? Not only is it saving wildlife but it is reducing car accidents and saving people too!

Wildlife Crossings

“Underpasses and overpasses and crossing structures are dotted all over the West, particularly where there’s a migration pattern of antelope or deer or elk,” Kehne said. “So it’s not a new technology, but it’s very effective. These types of wildlife undercrossings have proven to work well in places such as Banff, CanadaPinedale, Wyoming; and Bend, Oregon. Conservationists say it’s important to get these fixes in places now — before suburban sprawl reaches into wilder areas and makes it even harder for wildlife to get around,” explains MyModernMet.

Here is an update by some of the states that are moving forward with constructing underpasses, overpasses and crossing structures.

Oregon

“Oregon has also seen a substantial reduction in wildlife collisions near Bend, after two underpasses were built to help connect important mule deer habitat. The highway cuts off summer ranges in the Cascades from winter ranges in the desert.

“There isn’t really the option to try to keep the deer on one side of the highway or the other. They have this biological imperative that drives them from one side of the highway to the other, twice a year,” said ODFW’s Simon Wray in a video produced by the state.

After the underpasses were completed, collisions were reduced by up to 90 percent on that section U.S. Highway 97. Trail cameras have shown lots of deer using the fenced-in route — they’ve also captured a bear, coyotes, elk and small animals like badgers.

The Oregon Department of Transportation has plans in the works for two more wildlife underpasses along the highway. Construction on one is scheduled to start next year,” reports OPB News.

Utah

KSL.com announced that “the state’s newest overpass created solely for wildlife to cross officially opened in December 2018. A moose was even spotted for the official ribbon cutting. The overpass was designed to help animals cross safely and reduce the number of traffic accidents in Parleys Canyon. Complete with boulders and logs, the snow-covered path stretches across six lanes of Interstate 80. While saving the lives of animals is a bonus, the overpass was built to increase the safety of drivers along the freeway.

Big game often cross the roads between Mountain Dell and Jeremy Ranch. In the past two years, drivers have reported more than 100 wildlife-vehicle crashes in the area, and it’s estimated the number of unreported collisions is four times as many. Construction for the $5 million state-funded project has been going on since spring.

“From the Division of Wildlife Resources standpoint, the No. 1 benefit is public safety,” said Scott Root, DWR’s conservation outreach manager.

Root said considering how many collisions with wildlife the overpass can prevent, it would pay for itself down the road in 10, 20 years, we’re hoping.”

Washington

“We’re standing in the middle of the Cascades, where there’s a bottleneck of habitat. We’re standing on top of six lanes of freeway that carry 28,000 vehicles a day. Wildlife have got to cross this freeway,” Watkins said, looking out over the cars zooming by below.

The crossing is taller than your average bridge. Once it’s completed, it will have 8-foot fences that will funnel wildlife to where they should cross. The bridge will be covered in rocks and native plants. That way wildlife won’t even realize they’ve left the safety of the forest.

Even without all that camouflage, workers saw deer using the bridge almost immediately — while construction crews were still pushing equipment around. As wildlife undercrossings were completed as a first part of the project in 2014, more than 13,000 deer and hundreds of coyotes have safely reached the other side of the road, said Meagan Lott, with the Washington Department of Transportation. She said culverts in the undercrossings have helped salmon and bull trout reach stretches of river cut off to them for decades.

Watkins expects the new bridge will eventually be used by more than 60,000 species. “From frogs and salamanders, who are going to take quite a while to cross, to mountain lions and bears and wolverines. We’re rebuilding a forest over the interstate,” Watkins said.

Conservationists say it’s important to get these fixes in places now — before suburban sprawl reaches into wilder areas and makes it even harder for wildlife to get around. It could also help with wolf recovery. To meet recovery goals, wolves need a way to get across the Cascades. Chase Gunnell, with Conservation Northwest, said this bridge could help.

“Wildlife can’t persist in large numbers and in perpetuity in islands of habitat. It’s really knitting together smaller habits, reconnecting landscapes, to allow animals to move in and utilize smaller areas of habitat,” reports OPB News. Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment

Why Does My Dog have such Bad Gas?

It could be many things. Did it just start? Has it been happening for a while? What breed do you have? Did you switch your furry loved one’s food? It can be the sign of something more serious or an underlining condition than just a smelly problem for the people in the room.

Flatulence occurs when gas accumulates in your dog’s intestinal tract and colon. This is a normal process that occurs when bacteria break down certain types of food.

Causes of Flatulence in Dogs

“Dietary causes are the main source of flatulence in dogs. Low-quality foods with ingredients that can’t be fully digested can cause gas. So do random table scraps and foods containing lactose. Some animals may also have food sensitivities and allergies, too, so it’s important to find out what your dog’s stomach can and cannot handle. Flatulence can also occur when a dog eats too rapidly and may swallow air,” reports Pets.WebMD.com. Certain food groups, such as indigestible carbohydrates, lead to gas, and foods and treats that have a high meat content can create truly foul-smelling farts. Which Dogs Are Most at Risk?

All dogs can develop flatulence, especially if they’re fed a low-quality food with fillers and artificial preservatives, random table scraps, too many snacks or foods they’re allergic to.

Could Flatulence Be A Symptom of Another Health Issue?

Persistent canine flatulence can be a side effect of certain medications and can also be a symptom of other medical problems. The American Kennel Club reports on Aerophagia and GI Illness in dogs:

Aerophagia in Dogs

It is widely believed that aerophagia, or increased swallowing of air, can lead to gas in dogs. Greedy eaters that wolf down their food, and brachycephalic breeds are at an increased risk of swallowing more air than normal, which can lead to gas down the line, so to speak.

 

GI Illness in Dogs

Stinky dog farts can also have a more serious cause. Any GI disorder that leads to malabsorption of nutrients in your dog’s intestines can lead to increased gas production and odor. Histiocytic ulcerative colitis, a disease that Boxers are predisposed to and French Bulldogs are reported to be prone to, can cause increased dog farts, as can inflammatory bowel disease, which Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers and Yorkshire Terriers are predisposed to. Parasites, the parvovirus, tumors, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, enteritis, and an overgrowth of small intestinal bacteria can also cause excessive flatulence in dogs. If your dog is very gassy, check to see if he is also showing other symptoms of GI illness, such as a painful abdomen, loss of appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, or any other change in behavior or activity levels.

What Can I Do to Reduce My Dog’s Flatulence?

According to Pets.WebMD.com, feeding a consistent and healthy diet is the best way to reduce your dog’s flatulence. Here are a couple of rules to follow:

  • Feed your dog a nutritious, highly digestible food. Do a little research to find the brands that are appropriate for his age, breed and lifestyle. Watch out for ingredients like ash, low-quality proteins and corn products that make your dog feel full, but aren’t rich in nutrition. And do ask your vet for advice about pet food.
  • Don’t feed your dog random table scraps. Allergies or sensitivities to certain foods are common.
  • If your adult canine is a fast eater, you might divide his portion in half and let him eat two small meals a day.
  • Know your dog’s allergies and food sensitivities, and steer clear of foods that will irritate her stomach.
  • Some dogs are also lactose intolerant. Avoid dairy products.
  • You’ll know you’re feeding your dog a healthy, highly digestible food when he no longer has gas and begins to excrete firm, well-formed feces.

Finding the Cause of Dog Farts

“Dog farts are gross, but there are things that can be done about them. First, though, you need to isolate the cause. This will probably require help from your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will first perform a physical exam to look for other signs of illness. Then, depending on her findings, she may pursue additional testing, for example diagnostic imaging, blood work, and a fecal exam to check for parasites, to rule out any serious causes.

Keep in mind that food allergies are often tricky to diagnose, so you may have to be patient while your veterinarian rules out other possible causes and puts your dog on an elimination diet. Sometimes, fixing dog farts is as simple as cutting out table scraps; eliminating access to repulsive snacks like the cat box, road kill, or spoiled food; and keeping your dog out of the trash. Exercise can also help with flatulence. Active dogs tend to be less gassy than sedentary dogs, so grab your dog's leash and collar and walk off some of that gas,” states the American Kennel Club. Make sure to check with your veterinarian to see what he or she recommends for your dog. If you have any questions about your dog, call your local Veterinarian to assist you? Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Dog Breeds that are Hypoallergenic

Have someone in your home that has allergies to a dog or dog dander? Want to know of the breeds that are hypoallergenic so you can still love and enjoy a pet without the negative side effects of being allergic to them?

Here is some help on the way. Check out these dog breeds that would be easier on your immune system and not flair up your inflammation!

Hypoallergenic breeds

“Dander is the most commonly troublesome pet allergen. This is shed by the skin of warm-blooded pets, and can be found on the animal’s fur. Pet saliva is another common allergen. These allergens then latch on to the pet’s hair. As a result, people often mistakenly assume the fur is the major culprit in this scenario, when in actual fact the fur is simply the carrier. While no cats, dogs, rodents or even birds are completely non-allergenic, hypoallergenic pets produce less allergens than the others.  A number of adorably fluffy cat and dog breeds are considered ‘hypoallergenic breeds’. These breeds produce fewer allergens than other breeds, earning them this title,” reports Bisselldirect.com

PetMD.com reports that these dog breeds are hypoallergenic. These breeds produce fewer allergens, which make them a preferable choice for allergy sufferers. Also, there is no such thing as a 100 percent hypoallergenic pet. The following guideline recommends these canine breeds for people who want to adopt a dog, but are limited by allergies:

Here is information on each breed:

Airedale Terrier The Airedale Terrier is the largest and toughest of the terrier family. Its coat is dense and wiry, with a softer undercoat, and comes in both tan and black and tan and grizzle. This breed was one of the first used for police duty and has also been popular among U.S. Presidents (e.g., Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, and Warren Harding).

Bichon Frisé The Bichon Frisé is a small-framed dog with a heavenly white coat that puffs up. After many centuries developing in Europe, it has become a lovable and cuddling addition to many families today.

Chinese Crested (both hairless and Powderpuff) This elegant toy dog craves human companionship. It comes in two varieties: Hairless (with hair on its head, tail and feet) and Powderpuff (with hair all over). Curiously, the two types of the Chinese Crested Dog often come from the same litter. Kerry Blue Terrier Originally bred as a farm dog in the mountainous regions of Ireland, the Kerry Blue Terrier is a stunning show dog and a giddy house pet. If you want an active dog that will be begging you to run, explore, and play with it, then this athletic fur ball with a blue-gray coat should be your pet of choice.

Poodle (standard and miniature) Available in miniature and standard varieties, the Poodle breed belongs to the non-sporting classification. Though its direct origin is questionable, it was the French that first bred its different types. Originally used as an aid for duck hunters, the Poodle has become a circus performer, a frequent dog show winner, a guide dog, and a loving pet. Portuguese Water Dog The Portuguese Water Dog is a well-mannered, adventurous dog breed that is widely accepted as an excellent family companion. Although its ancestry is thought to have begun along the steppes of Central Asia around 700 B.C., its popularity was established in Portugal, where it is referred to as Cao de Agua -- Cao meaning dog, and de Agua meaning water.

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier This medium-sized Irish terrier is not only powerful but gentle and affectionate. The Wheaten Terrier, most often noted for its warm, wheaten-colored coat, is also athletic and able to compete in dog trials or shows that require agility. A wonderful companion for those looking for a curious indoor dog.

West Highland White Terrier The West Highland Terrier, or "Westie", is known for its friendly, strong-willed personality and a remarkably bright white coat. It’s a real terrier with tons of courage, confidence, determination and loyalty packed into a tiny body. If you have any questions about a dog breed, call your local Veterinarian to assist you? Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Which Animals Sleep the Most Per Day?

We can all agree that sleep is very important for a healthy lifestyle and to function. This rings true for humans and animals. The animal in the world that needs the most sleep in one day is the Koala for about 22 hours (out of 24 hours) and the animal that sleeps the least, the giraffe, only requires 30 minutes to 1.9 hours. That’s a huge difference.

Factors

“A variety of factors affect how long an animal sleeps. Perhaps the most important factor is its size. In general, smaller animals need more sleep than larger animals. Small bats, chipmunks and opossums all sleep for 15 hours or more per day. In contrast, big elephants, giraffes and horses all sleep for about five hours or less.

Another factor is whether the animal is a hunter or is hunted. Predators such as lions and tigers get plenty of sleep; they have little to fear. But animals that are prey, such as deer, tend to get less sleep. They need to remain alert and aware of nearby predators.

Age is another factor that affects the sleep of animals. Like humans, animals may sleep for different lengths of time at different life stages. For example, young animals may need to sleep more than adults.

Captivity also can affect an animal’s sleep. Wild animals often get more sleep when they are in a zoo. Food is provided for them, and they are safe from predators. So they can relax and sleep for longer periods of time.

In contrast, animals have to spend time hunting or gathering their food in the wild. Some animals have to migrate for weeks across long distances. Many also have to remain alert when predators are nearby. So they may spend less time sleeping in their natural environment,” according to SleepEducation.com.

Dogs and Cats

An adult dog typically sleeps 12–14 hours a day, while puppies often sleep more than that, usually up to 18 hours a day! Unlike humans, dogs don't have a regular sleep regimen. They take several short naps during the day. The average adult feline sleeps 12 to 16 hours a day. Newborn dogs and cats can sleep closer to 20 hours a day.

Animal sleeping hours

Below are animals (including human) with the amount of average sleeping hours required per day (24 hours):

Koala 22 hours LONGEST SLEEPING ANIMAL

Large Hairy Armadillo - 20.4 hours

Little Pocket Mouse - 20.1 hours

Brown Bat - 19.9 hours

North American Opossum - 18 hours

Python - 18 hours

Owl Monkey - 7 hours

Human Infant - 16 hours

Tigger - 15.8 hours

Tree Shrew - 15.8 hours

Cats - 15 hours

Squirrel - 15 hours

Sloth - 14 hours

Chinchillas - 13 hours

Dogs - 12 to 14 hours

Hedgehogs - 10 hours

Chimpanzees - 9 hours

Rabbits - 8 hours

Humans (Adults) - 7 – 9 hours

Seals - 6 hours

Deer - 3 – 4 hours

Sheep - 3 – 4 hours

Elephants - 2 – 4 hours

Horses - 2 – 3 hours

Giraffe - 30 mins - 1.9 hours SHORTEST SLEEPING ANIMAL

Sources: Reader’s Digest, Tuck, Top10Hell It may seem like your dog is sleeping too much, but their lifestyle, amount of exercise, and what breed they are may affect the amount of sleep they need. Even the age of the dog impacts the amount of sleep they require. Puppies sleep excessively while larger dogs tend to sleep more than smaller dogs. If you have any questions about your animal and their sleep patterns or amount of sleep, call your local Veterinarian to assist you? Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

What to do if you see Animal Cruelty?

You might be saving an animal’s life but also a person’s life if you take some safe action after observing animal cruelty. The Animal Legal Defense Fund reports that “a 2017 study showed that 89% of women who had companion animals during an abusive relationship reported that their animals were threatened, harmed, or killed by their abusive partner”.

According to PETA, “witnessing cruelty to animals is an upsetting experience, but knowing how to handle the situation properly can save a life and prevent the abuser from harming other victims. Here are several things to do recommended by PETA if you see someone abuse an animal:

  1. Remain calm and get veterinary care.
  2. Speak up, because if you don’t, who will?
  3. Know the law.
  4. Document the crime with photos or video. 
  5. File a first information report (FIR) with the police immediately. Report the crime to the police.
  6. Contact animal-protection groups.PETA’s helpful links to online directories.
  7. Be persistent.
  8. Thank the people who helped”.

Signs of animal abuse / cruelty

How do you know if an animal is being abused? Here are some physical and environmental signs of cruelty described by The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals:

Physical signs of cruelty

  • Tight collar that has caused a neck wound or has become embedded in the pet's neck
  • Open wounds, signs of multiple healed wounds or an ongoing injury or illness that isn't being treated
  • Untreated skin conditions that have caused loss of hair, scaly skin, bumps or rashes
  • Extreme thinness or emaciation—bones may be visible
  • Fur infested with fleas, ticks or other parasites
  • Patches of bumpy, scaly skin rashes
  • Signs of inadequate grooming, such as extreme matting of fur, overgrown nails and dirty coat
  • Weakness, limping or the inability to stand or walk normally
  • Heavy discharge from eyes or nose
  • An owner striking or otherwise physically abusing an animal
  • Visible signs of confusion or extreme drowsiness

Environmental signs of cruelty

  • Pets are tied up alone outside for long periods of time without adequate food or water, or with food or water that is unsanitary
  • Pets are kept outside in inclement weather without access to adequate shelter
  • Pets are kept in an area littered with feces, garbage, broken glass or other objects that could harm them
  • Animals are housed in kennels or cages (very often crowded in with other animals) that are too small to allow them to stand, turn around and make normal movements

Where to report animal abuse / cruelty

If you have any questions about an animal being abused, call your local Veterinarian to assist you? Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

Is Your Pet Safe Eating? Animal Food Recalls and Alerts.

Unfortunately foods can be toxic to humans and animals. There are several resources available to check to see if there are any current food recalls and alerts for your furry loved ones.

Here are the resources and what is being discussed and possibly recalled now:

U.S. Food & Drug Administration

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration put out an alert to pet owners about potentially toxic levels of Vitamin D in several dry pet foods. After receiving complaints from pet owners about dogs with vitamin D toxicity, one of the firms reported to the FDA that it was recalling dry pet food due to potentially toxic levels of vitamin D. Many other brands with a common contract manufacturer have also been recalled. Here is a list about the brands that have been recalled.

Fast Facts

  • The FDA is alerting pet owners and veterinary professionals about recalls of several dry dog foods after receiving complaints that dogs eating the food experienced vitamin D toxicity.
  • Testing found that samples of the dog food contained excessive, potentially toxic amounts of vitamin D. Vitamin D is an essential nutrient for dogs, but very high amounts can cause serious health problems like kidney failure or death.
  • At this time, the only pet products that have been impacted are food made for dogs.
  • Pet owners should discontinue feeding these recalled products.
  • The FDA is asking veterinarians who suspect vitamin D toxicity in their patients to report them through the Safety Reporting Portalor by calling their local FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinators. Pet owners can also report suspect cases to the FDA.
  • This is a developing situation and additional recalls may be announced.

American Veterinary Medical Association

The American Veterinary Medical Association has a page on their website about animal food recalls and alerts. You can check it from time to time to stay current.

Animal Health Foundation

This website has an entire year of what is happening in the pet food industry.

Petfood Industry

Stay up to date with Petfood Industry’s list of US and international cat and dog food, pet treat and companion animal feed recalls. According to FDA, pet food can be recalled by a manufacturer to remove product from the market, by FDA request or by FDA order under statutory authority.

Dog Food Advisor

The Dog Food Advisor is a public service website put out by Mike Sagman designed to help pet owners make more informed decisions when buying dog food. Here is a list of the current dog food recalls.

Petful

Petful has been researching U.S. dog food recalls for several years now, and they have compiled the following list. Recalls are listed in order from newest to oldest. Looking for cat food recalls? Go here.

If you have any questions about your pet’s food, call your local Veterinarian to assist you? Animal Care Center in Smyrna, GA, is owned and operated by Otto H. Williams, DVM. The veterinary practice specializes in complete healthcare for cats and dogs and offers services including preventative, surgical and nonsurgical care, internal medicine, grooming and boarding to Cobb County and surrounding cities such as Vinings, Marietta, Mableton and Sandy Springs. Call today at 770.438.2694 or request an appointment.

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